Health

IMG_1514 2Community health goes hand-in-hand with environmental health.  A holistic approach to community health views a healthy community as healthy people living in a healthy environment.

The data tools on this page can help you to explore impacts of different forms of energy extraction and production on community health.  We focus on widely agreed-upon signs of human and environmental health that  powerfully indicate overall community health. For instance, infant mortality is frequently used as an indicator of the general state of health in a community. Overall, communities in which many babies die early tend to suffer from poor health.

Mountains

In keeping with a holistic approach to health and well-being, future versions of this website will include indicators not only of physical health, but of mental, emotional, spiritual, and psychological wellbeing. Note, the tools do not prove that there is a causal correlation according to scholarly standards of statistical significance. 

(This beta version of website only includes coal datasets; datasets for the other listed energy sources will be included after the initial review and collaborator input).

Health Index

This map shows  how states rank on a health index developed by the Social Science Research Council that is primarily based on life expectancy.

Data shown for years 2000, 2005, 2008, 2010 (toggle switch on upper right hand side of map).  Cumulative coal production shown from 1983-2013. TO GET METRICS FOR ONE STATE. CLICK ON THAT STATE.

Life Expectancy at Birth

This map shows data for states from the years 2000, 2005, 2008, 2010 (toggle switch on upper right hand side of map).  Cumulative coal production shown from 1983-2013. TO GET METRICS FOR ONE STATE. CLICK ON THAT STATE.

METADATA: Coal production data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) and the U.S. Mine Safety and Health Administration (downloaded from historical coal production data (1983-2014) under "Production" tab on http://www.eia.gov/coal/data.cfm. All data used in these indices come from official U.S. government sources—the American Community Survey of the U.S. Census Bureau and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We have downloaded the datasets from the Measure of America (http://www.measureofamerica.org/maps/)

Please send us feedback, using the Participatory Design page, about additional indicators for which you would like to see data. Indicators currently under consideration include:

  • birth defects
  • kidney disease
  • lung disease (including black lung)
  • skin problems
  • hospitalization rates
  • pulmonary disease
  • hypertension
  • psychosocial stress/solastalgia
  • social Health
  • addiction
  • substance abuse
  • mental health
  • life expectancy at birth
  • clean drinking water security
  • chronic disease
  • disability
  • teenage pregnancies
  • access to healthcare
  • premature births
  • cancer incidence
  • asthma rates
  • heart attacks
  • exposure to hazards, contaminants, and toxic releases
  • air quality